19th ARDF world Championships – Final update

The final event for the championships was the second classic.

Ewen, Jack, Jenelle and Peter all competed on 80m, whilst Kristian was the only Australian competitor on 2m.

Thankfully the terrain and map were very appropriate for an ARDF event.
All Australian competitors did very well, getting all of the required transmitters with plenty of time to spare.

  • Jenelle just missed the podium, placing 5th in a time of 112’41.
  • Kristian was unable to beat the “sweet, handsom” M21 boys, finishing just outside of the top ten, placing 11th in a time of 65’05.
  • Ewen placed 18th in a time of 114’10.
  • Jack and Peter were inseperable, placing 25th and 26th in 99’33 and 100′ respectively.

Tonight the team will celebrate our achievements before  boarding flights back home tomorrow.

Thanks for reading the updates. ūüôā

Full results here:
https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/180907m80+2-erg.htm
https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/180907m80+2-lzl.htm

Map image available here:https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/18090407.htm#map180907m80+2

Follow us on Facebook:facebook.com/ARDF.VK3

19th ARDF World Championships – Update 2

On Tuesday the first cassic event took place.
In a nutshell, it was tough. 6 out of 6 Aussies agreed that the course was very difficult. (but perhaps in more colourful language)
The map was large (B4) and was very colourful with lots of dense forest, many uncrossable features and decent contours to contend with. Many competitors were over the 140 min time limit and many competitors did not find the required transmitters.
Kristian and Nelly competed on 80m.
Ewen, Jack, Jenelle and Peter competed on 2m.

  • Kristian completed the course in 124 mins.
  • Ewen found 1 Tx and finished on time.
  • Nelly finished in perfect time (with 44 seconds to spare) but unfortunatley didn’t find any Tx’s.
  • Peter, Jack and Jenelle found 1 Tx each but finished over time.

Results can be viewed here:
https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/180905m2+80-erg.htm
https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/180905m2+80-lzl.htm

_

Todays sprint event was more enjoyable for all competitors. The open forest in this area allowed for quick running. All of the Aussie competitors found all of their Tx’s except for Peter and Jack.
The uncrossable fence 2/3’s of the way down the map caused some difficulty for many competitors trying to find transmatter 2F (Which also had its antena knocked down on the ground for approximately 20 mins during the event.)

  • Ewen placed 5th.
  • Jenelle placed 7th.
  • Nelly finished 18th.
  • Kristian finished 21st.
  • Jack and Peter both missed one Tx.

Results can be viewed here:
https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/180906SP-erg.htm

https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/180906SP-lzl.htm

 

After the sprint Jack, Nelly and Peter went on a tour to the unification observatory and DMZ museum.

Ewen, Jenelle and Kristian explored a local film set that contained many historic replica buildings from different periods and thought that they might find some instruments to assist in the local terrain.
Jenelle found a ladder (intended for storming castles) to assist with the impossible hills, whilst Ewen and Kristian found a battering ram to assit with getting through the inpenetrable forest.

_

Follow us on facebook:facebook.com/ARDF.VK3

Maps for events can be viewed in more detail here:

https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/18090407.htm#map180905m2+80

 

19th ARDF World Championships – Update 1

6 athletes (5 from VIC and 1 from Qld.) Are currently in Sokcho, Korea for the 19th ARDF World Championships.
In the usual fashion competitors made their way to Korea  all at different times.

Jenelle and Ewen were the first to arrive, enjoying a week long tour of Korea before the event.

Peter and Kristian met up with Jenelle and Ewen just a couple of days before the event. As a team we headed on a tour to the DMZ and individual members enjoyed some of the historic and cultural sights around Korea.

On the arrival day Jack and Nelly met up with the rest of the team in Sokcho.
The following day we had training with 3 seperate model events which were held in the area surrounding the accomodation.
During the model events all equipment was tested and working except for one of the 2m beams had a broken BNC connector, but luckily there was a spare. (however the spare PVC beam exhibited a design flaw so no doubt a fault report will be lodged with the manufacturer on our return.)

The first event was the fox-or which was held today.
For each age category a different map was produced with only the required Tx’s shown. There were a total of 10 Tx’s (10mW) plus the beacon (3W) but the longest course only covered 8 of the TX’s (map shown below for M21). Each Tx had its own morse identifier and were numbered 1-5 and 1F-5F.

_
The frequencies for the foxes were 3520 kHz (1,2,1F,2F), 3550 kHz (3,3F,4,4F) and 3580 kHZ (5, 5F) with the beacon being on 3600 kHz.

All Australian competitors completed the course within the allocated time.

  • Jenelle and Ewen both finished 7th in thier categories.
  • Kristian finished 24th in M21.
  • Nelly finished 27th in W21.
  • Peter missed 1 Tx.
  • Jack missed 2 Tx’s.Full results can be viewed for todays fox-or event here:
    https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/180904FO-lzl.htm https://ardf.darc.de/contest/18090407/180904FO-erg.htm

Sprint Training

With the forecast wind and hail, 9 brave souls attempted the ARDF Sprint training held in and around Deakin Uni. A couple also did some of the Enduro controls, which was an orienteering event starting from the same spot.

The format of the event was a Five-in-Five 2m event, which in theory is possible to complete in about 6.5 minutes, followed immediately by an 80m Sprint ARDF event. Five-in-Five uses classic 5 minute cycle (1 minute each) ARDF transmitters spaced close enough that it should be possible, walking, to get to each transmitter as it comes on first time (for you). Only Jack WWW managed to get the transmitters in under 10 minutes (2 cycles). Good effort, Jack !¬† He admits he had a bit of luck, with earlier competitors just leaving transmitters as he approached, helping to lead him in. The time limit for this part of the event was set to 30 minutes. The transmitters were all in parkland, just off a track. In you look at the splits, below, you’ll also see Jack was the only one to do the transmitters in order, with everyone else going from #1 to #5, and then to others. Perhaps some just happened across #5 by accident ?

Mark, Suzanne & Rodney elected to only do the Five-in-Five course, with Mark the winner amongst those. Suzanne suffered some late penalties (problems with #1), but still beat out Rodney for second place. Looking at the splits at control 6 (236), Jack was clearly the fastest at this part of the event, followed with an impressive 11 minutes by Jenelle.

An ARDF sprint event has a 1 minute complete cycle, with each transmitter only on for 12s each. This was set in an area with both complex buildings, the university, and parkland around Gardiners Creek. TX #5 and #4 were in amongst the buildings and this proved too much for Jack and Peter, but not so Kris and Jennelle, who both managed those with ease. Monica liked #5 so much she punched it twice (see splits below) !¬† Clearly after being so flustered by those two tricky TX’s, Jack and Peter both also forgot to punch the Finish Beacon (which you are required to do at international events).

And TX #1 in the uni accommodation area ? Well, it had to be there didn’t it ūüôā¬† Can’t make it too easy !¬† Generally competitors had to plan and DF carefully in this event, as it could be easy to end up the wrong side of the creek. Competitors doing both events had an un-timed (up to a 10min limit) transition leg between 2m and 80m, to get their 80m gear in order. I’m happy to say the software handled this perfectly, and I didn’t have to adjust the times it published at all.

Yep, we got that hail, and the heavy rain, but luckily both were only for short bursts, being perfect running conditions otherwise. Monica says the hail even helped her spot TX#5, as she sought shelter under cover. Besides, it’s good practice and testing for your gear, as sometimes weather can be quite unpredictable at international events. Torrential downpours are not uncommon. Thanks to Ewen for the new 80m Sprint TXs. Proto TX#1 for the 2m set has now been completed (and works), so soon we’ll have a 6-TX set on both bands.

Thank you to everyone who helped pick up the transmitters afterwards, just before the rain came (again). Apologies to Monica for not giving her a key on her first attempt.

Here’s the map, with TX locations shown. I’ve used A->E for the 80m TX, and 1->5 for 2m TX. BB was the location of both 2m and 80m beacons.


Here’s the full results:

Name Callsign Course #TX Score Late Penalty Time Place   1 Time 2 Time 3 Time 4 Time 5 Time 6 Time
Mark VK3BES FiveInFive 6 51 0 22:24:00 1 231 11:17:00 232 12:15:00 235 14:17:00 234 19:42:00 233 21:45:00 236 22:49:00
Suzanne VK3FSZI FiveInFive 6 24 27 38:39:00 2 231 17:40:00 232 18:57:00 233 23:24:00 234 32:43:00 235 36:17:00 236 39:06:00
Rodney VK3FRLS FiveInFive 13 20 0 20:53:00 3 231 01:28:00 235 02:44:00
1 Time 2 Time 3 Time 4 Time 5 Time 6 Time 7 Time 8 Time 9 Time
10
Time 11 Time 12 Time 13 Time 14 Time
Kristian VK3FDAC FullSprint 13 102 0 39:11:00 1 231 01:16:00 235 03:39:00 234 05:07:00 232 12:18:00 233 13:25:00 236 14:06:00 37 15:45:00 33 19:24:00 31 24:25:00 32 28:49:00 34 33:23:00 35 40:13:00 36 41:18:00
Jenelle VK3FJTE FullSprint 13 102 0 47:25:00 2 231 01:21:00 235 03:13:00 233 06:17:00 232 07:12:00 234 09:18:00 236 10:53:00 37 14:40:00 34 27:46:00 35 31:46:00 32 37:11:00 33 45:30:00 31 48:15:00 36 51:38:00
Ewen VK3OW FullSprint 13 102 0 69:51:00 3 231 01:17:00 235 05:46:00 233 11:08:00 232 11:49:00 234 14:23:00 236 15:59:00 37 17:48:00 33 20:37:00 31 25:19:00 32 30:53:00 34 40:53:00 35 69:21:00 36 71:57:00
Monica VK3FFAB FullSprint 13 102 0 74:25:00 4 231 01:20:00 235 10:35:00 232 12:12:00 233 14:03:00 234 14:36:00 236 15:50:00 37 22:50:00 35 27:48:00 32 35:04:00 34 43:50:00 33 68:04:00 31 76:13:00 36 79:52:00 35 27:51:00
Jack VK3WWW FullSprint 13 81 0 43:09:00 5 231 01:26:00 232 02:46:00 233 03:52:00 234 04:42:00 235 05:32:00 236 07:44:00 37 09:53:00 31 16:05:00 32 21:10:00 33 43:52:00
Peter Val FullSprint 13 81 0 74:24:00 6 231 12:01:00 235 13:39:00 232 17:16:00 233 18:44:00 234 19:49:00 236 21:23:00 37 23:57:00 33 47:57:00 31 52:24:00 32 60:16:00

 

 

The long and winding road from Moldova to Walachia (north to south)

Heading east from Maramures -lush green fields
Heading east from Maramures -lush green fields
Borga Pass Road
Borga Pass Road
Entrance gate to Moldovita
Entrance gate to Moldovita

The long and winding road from Moldova through Transylvania to Walachia (north to south)

Easter decorated egg competition between many of the villages
Easter decorated egg competition between many of the villages

From our rural retreat in Maramures we headed east to Moldova crossing the Carpathians by the Borgo pass road enroute to Bucovina. Egg painting is a competition among the villages at Easter time.

 Roadside Mici BBq
Roadside Mici BBq

Lunch today was Mici, a rectangular meat pattie cooked on a BBQ and served with mustard sauce.

Entrance gate at Monastery at Moldovita - beautiful rose gardens
Entrance gate at Monastery at Moldovita – beautiful rose gardens
Monastery at Moldovita
Monastery at Moldovita
Frescoes on southern wall Moldovita monastery
Frescoes on southern wall Moldovita monastery

Visited two painted monasteries (orthodox). The first was for the local community (Moldovita) and used as a refuge in times of siege. Note the wall and the strong wooden gate.

Monastery at Sucevita for the priests
Monastery at Sucevita for the priests
Frescoes showing the challenges priests faced in trying to get to heaven
Frescoes showing the challenges priests faced in trying to get to heaven

The second was for the clergy (Sucevita). The outside walls of the church was decorated, one illustrating the difficult path in getting into heaven. Inside, the frescoes showed various methods of torture and head lopping. Again a walled garden and plenty of room for the local community to shelter in times of siege.

One sad and lonely bear at the game park for big animals found in Romania
One sad and lonely bear at the game park for big animals found in Romania
One sad and lonely bear at the game park for big animals found in Romania
One sad and lonely bear at the game park for big animals found in Romania
Bison
Bison
One of several varieties of deer
One of several varieties of deer

Next highlight of the road was the animal reservation with animals native to the area. One sad and lonely bear, a small herd of buffalo and several different species of deer.

Bicaz Gorge
Bicaz Gorge
Bicaz Gorge 2
Bicaz Gorge 2
Green walnut jam
Green walnut jam

We drove through the Bicaz gorge (river running down the side). Sampled some green nut jam. Walnuts cooked in a syrup halfway between golden syrup and malt extract. An acquired taste.

Lake Rosu
Lake Rosu
Lake Rosu
Lake Rosu
More pretty villages along the way
More pretty villages along the way
Horse and cart - effective mode of transport in rural areas
Horse and cart – effective mode of transport in rural areas

Our route took us past Lake Rosu, really a dam and then onto Brasov.

Black Lutheran church on Brasov
Black Lutheran church on Brasov
Johannes Honter introduced Lutherism to Brasov - pointing at this school
Johannes Honter introduced Lutherism to Brasov – pointing at this school
Johannes Honter school in Brasov
Johannes Honter school in Brasov
Brasov city square
Brasov city square

Brasov is also fortified. City square with Lutheran church – aka Black Church due to a fire. Johannes Honterus was

responsible for setting up the Lutheran church and the building of the first school (directly across from the church). The original school was wooden but suffered the same fate as the church and was rebuilt in stone.

Late night shopping and family time in Brasov
Late night shopping and family time in Brasov

It has been particularly pleasant having an evening stroll through the many pedestrian malls in our travels.

Fortification on the hill outside Brasov
Fortification on the hill outside Brasov
Archery target practice at fortification on the hill outside Brasov
Archery target practice at fortification on the hill outside Brasov
Spectacular view from fortification on the hill outside Brasov
Spectacular view from fortification on the hill outside Brasov

Fort on the hill outside Brasov. Spectacular view of the surrounding country.

Bran castle - summer resience of Queen Mary of Bulgaria
Bran castle – summer resience of Queen Mary of Bulgaria
The scales of justice - not very just
Bran castle -The scales of justice – not very just and a good extortion racket
Scales of justice - basically you needed to way less than whatever you were weighed against to prove you were not a bad person
Bran castle РScales of justice Рbasically you needed to weigh more than whatever was considered to be a fair thing to prove you were not a bad person

Bran castle – summer residence of Queen Mary of Romania. No vampires in site. Apparently Vlad the Impaler (Dracula) was have seen it on his way through. The most interesting artifact was the scales of justice. Based on a person’s size and height, if they weighed less than expected they were considered apprentices of Satan and torture would commence. Hopefully you can read the information in the photo.

Peles castle at Sinaia
Peles castle at Sinaia
Peles castle at Sinaia with extensive gardens
Peles castle at Sinaia with extensive gardens
Frescoes inside courtyard at Peles castle
Frescoes inside courtyard at Peles castle
Wax seal on castle door - security business card?
Wax seal on castle door – security business card?
More of the Peles gardens
More of the Peles gardens
Pelisor Castle built for a king's relative
Pelisor Castle built for a king’s relative
Pelisor castle- very Tudor like in style
Pelisor castle- very Tudor like in style
Pelisor Castle 2
Pelisor Castle 2

The most elaborate building in Transylvania is Peles Castle. Unfortunately only outside views, but obviously prime real estate.

Maramures

View from guest house
View from guest house

Our guest house at Maramures is located in a peaceful rural setting apart from the chainsaws, angle grinders and whipper snippers. Hospitality here is exceptionally good.

Open air eating area
Open air eating area
Dinner cooking over the coals
Dinner cooking over the coals

Dinner was in an open air setting

Entree meat balls, soft cheeses, pork fat and tomato with onion bread

Bean soup

Pork goulash

The lightest, fluffiest and tastiest donuts ever with blackcurrant jam

All washed down with Palinka and black currant “cordial”

Folklore group
Folklore group
More dancing
More dancing
Dancing
Dancing
Barsana wooden monastery entrance gate
Barsana wooden monastery entrance gate
New construction Barsana wooden monastery
New construction Barsana wooden monastery
Beautiful grounds Barsana wooden monastery
Beautiful grounds Barsana wooden monastery
Barsana wooden monastery
Barsana wooden monastery
Beautiful grounds Barsana wooden monastery 2
Beautiful grounds Barsana wooden monastery 2
Barsana wooden monastery (washed river stone foundations)
Barsana wooden monastery (washed river stone foundations)
Biblical stories in pictorial form
Biblical stories in pictorial form
Panorama Barsana wooden monastery
Panorama Barsana wooden monastery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Needed a sleep in after last night!

Late start, headed for the local market, plenty of “stuff” to buy from clothing, shoes, manchester and tools. Too late for the animal market. Probably a good thing.

Checked out a modern monastery at Barsana, beautiful wooden buildings and gardens, church with pictorial stories.

Memorial to the opponents of the communist regime, very bleak place.

In a complete contrast we visited the Merry cemetery at Sapanta with colourful wooden headstones with pictures of deceased in their occupations and poems about them (all in Romanian of course)

Memorial to the Communist Resistance prisoners
Memorial to the Communist Resistance prisoners
Letters written by the prisoners
Letters written by the prisoners
Inside the prison
Inside the prison
Individual prison cell
Individual prison cell
Memorial wall and watch tower
Memorial wall and watch tower
Sapanta Merry Cemetery
Sapanta Merry Cemetery
Sapanta Merry Cemetery 2
Sapanta Merry Cemetery 2

Spent a leisurely afternoon in the outdoor area. We have eaten so well the last few days Ewen has survived since breakfast on only one jam pancake.

Railway station at Viseu de Sus
Railway station at Viseu de Sus
One of the steam engines on the Mocanita narrow gauge train
One of the steam engines on the Mocanita narrow gauge train
One of the steam engines on the Mocanita narrow gauge train 2
One of the steam engines on the Mocanita narrow gauge train 2
The line followed the river
The line followed the river
View along the valley from the train
View along the valley from the train
Another view along the valley from the train
Another view along the valley from the train
Our guide enjoying some down time
Our guide enjoying some down time
Big enough oil can ?
Big enough oil can ?
Running repairs
Running repairs
Picnic ground at the end of the line
Picnic ground at the end of the line
Hurry up and get this show on the road!
Hurry up and get this show on the road!
Still transporting timber the old fashioned way
Still transporting timber the old fashioned way

We could not escape Maramures without a ride on the Mocanita narrow gauge railway at Viseu de Sus very close to the Ukrainian border. For the more ardent train fans it was a 1930s vintage steam locomotive that was used to transport timber down the valley. Originally timber was floated down the river, but after a dam burst the train line was built. The 21km ride to the turn around point was supposed to take just over 2 hours. It became pretty evident early on that at the current speed something was amiss and it would be a lot longer (3 hours eventually). Repairs were needed along the way and after much banging and crashing a bearing was suitably adjusted and we continued on our way. Included in the tool set was a most impressive oil can.

The track followed the river most of the way. Still plenty of logging happening here with some unorthodox methods of transportation. A large tractor pulling 10 -15 m logs down the river and smaller pieces being drawn by horse driven carts.

At one point the river narrowed with steep cliffs and caves hidden behind bushes. It was here that the German army had a first aid centre and stored supplies. It was also the point when they planned to ambush the Red army. There was a small museum at the turn around point and a picnic ground.

The return trip took only 90 minutes which was a relief. Sufficiently rocked, rattled and shaken for the complete trip.

There are a few obstacles along the roads in Romania, this cart was one of the smaller ones.

PS  Jenelle is having a love hate relationship with the formatting!!

One of the smaller obstacles along the road
One of the smaller obstacles along the road

Bucharest and heading to Transylvania

Parliament House
Parliament House

Our trip began with a short 20 hour flight to Bucharest. The most impressive building in the city is the Parliament House, second largest building only to the Pentagon. Ceausescu thought he would leave his mark by commencing this build, fortunately for the people of Romania he didn’t live to see its completion. It is a magnificent building inside, very tastefully decorated with high ceilings, marble floors and beautiful rugs and chandeliers. (no photos unfortunately as did not have a camera pass)

View from balcony of Parliament house
View from balcony of Parliament house
Arc de Triumph - Bucharest
Arc de Triumph – Bucharest

 

 

 

 

 

Music Hall - Bucharest
Music Hall – Bucharest
Light globe changing in Music Hall
Light globe changing in Music Hall
Ceiling of music Hall
Ceiling of music Hall

Another beautiful building was the auditorium for musical concerts. We chanced upon workers changing a light globe, quite an art in itself.

We visited the old town and enjoyed a drop of the local ale.

 

 

 

 

View from hotel window
View from hotel window

Many old buildings in state of disrepair, including this ruin outside our hotel window. (more interesting than a carpark) Taken from our room as there was a sign outside indicating no photos to be taken (left over from communist regime)

From Bucharest we headed west to the church (in white limestone) where the Romanian kings were buried. Lavishly decorated inside. Vlad the Impaler (Dracula) lived in the building behind this church.

Kings church
Kings church
Ornate interior of Kings church
Ornate interior of Kings church
Crumbling fortifications protecting Transylvania
Crumbling fortifications protecting Transylvania
Romanian donut
Romanian donut

 

 

 

 

This is one of the fortifications that the Austrian Hungarian Emperor sent German people to build in 12-13th century. It has suffered due to earthquakes over time. Opted not to climb the 1460 steps. Chose to indulge in a Romanian donut instead!

Dam wall
Dam wall
The road through the valley leading up to the pass to Transylvania
The road through the valley leading up to the pass to Transylvania
Enjoying the view
Enjoying the view
Transfagarasan Road 1
Transfagarasan Road 1
Transfagarasan Road 2
Transfagarasan Road 2
Cable car
Cable car

There was a very large dam (about the size of Hoover Dam) that needed closer inspection. Traversed the Transfagarasan Road (of Jeremy Clarkson fame), (perfect for road testing a corvette or similar vehicle) and then took a cable car for a less exhilarating ride.

Please excuse the erratic formatting. Only get to practice this once a year.  Jenelle

Walking the Nakasendo Way

ARDF Blog

Thank you for Kristian and Bruce for writing the blog during the ARDF competition while Ewen was doing his team leader duties and waiting for Jenelle to be rescued from parts unknown.  All six of us are all bringing home extra baggage in the form of medals.

Facilities at Sanyo Hotel exceeded our expectations

Dining room
Dining room
Where do I start, Kristian was not the only one with this dilemna
Where do I start, Kristian was not the only one with this dilemna

 

 

 

 

 

 

In our rooms chaos reigned

The workshop - organised chaos
The workshop – organised chaos
Work bench
Work bench
Trying to be tidy
Trying to be tidy
Cable spaghetti
Cable spaghetti

 

 

 

 

 

Photos from the closing celebrations

3 Amigos
3 Amigos
Kai (W60)
Kai (W60)
New friends
New friends

 

 

 

 

 

Banquet _ one of the many platters
Banquet _ one of the many platters
With one of the more elegant W60s
With one of the more elegant W60s
With one of the more elegant W60s
With one of the more elegant W60s

 

 

 

 

 

Fine and sunny departure from Shibukawa
Fine and sunny departure from Shibukawa

We left the competition area in fine weather and sunshine (compared to the cloudy wet conditions) to be dropped off at various locations. Jack left before the rest of us were up, Greg was settled in for the long ride back to Tokyo, Kristian joined us for the train trip to Takasaki and was last seen running upstairs with his bag to catch his connecting train in under 4 minutes. (a fair indication of his fitness level). Bruce, Ewen and I continued our adventure and finally arrived in Matsumoto.

 

 

We spent some time in the Time Piece museum

Time Piece Museum
Time Piece Museum
This brings back memories
This brings back memories
 Rolling Ball Clock
Rolling Ball Clock

 

 

 

 

 

and then devised our own street-o to various sites including shrines, temples, gardens and the icecream shop.

Control 1
Control 1
 Control 2
Control 2
Control 3
Control 3
Control 4
Control 4
This looks like a good place to send my boys
This looks like a good place to send my boys
Gallery forecourt
Gallery forecourt
Gallery forecourt 2
Gallery forecourt 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Choosing dinner is always an interesting experience, our choices so far have been most acceptable.

Japanese BBQ
Japanese BBQ – very good

 

 

 

 

 

Yesterdays trek was along the Nakasendo Way (built during Edo period) commencing after a 20 minute bus ride from Nakatsugawa, and continued through Magome to Tsumago. At this point (after 3 hr 30 min of walking and lots of up and downhill) Ewen and I opted for the bus to Nagiso station. Bruce continued on foot and arrived at the same time as the bus.

Road leading to start of Walk _ note artifical waterfall
Road leading to start of Walk _ note artifical waterfall
Ewen at start of walk
Ewen at start of walk
Nakasendo Way 1
Nakasendo Way 1
Mini headstones 2
Mini headstones 2
 One more step along the road I go
One more step along the road I go
Mamoth stone tablet
Mamoth stone tablet
 Garden at stone tablet
Garden at stone tablet
 Entrance to town
Entrance to Magome
Little village
Little village
One of many water wheels - accosted by two schoolgirls to complete survey
One of many water wheels – accosted by two schoolgirls to complete survey
Nearly at top of hill but still a long way to go
Nearly at top of hill but still a long way to go
 Rice paddies and cypress
Rice paddies and cypress
Rice harvesting
Rice harvesting

DSC_0610 (Medium) Big Tonka Truck

 Mini stone headstones
Mini stone headstones
More mini tablets
More mini tablets
Another pretty spot
Another pretty spot
Old Edo town - Tsumago
Old Edo town – Tsumago
Rocky creek bed
Rocky creek bed
Water wheels needed a lot of investigation
Water wheels needed a lot of investigation
 Rocky creek bed
Rocky creek bed
 Entrance to Tsumago
Entrance to Tsumago
Cleansing facilities
Cleansing facilities in the little towns
A D51351, whatever that is, for the train buffs
A D51351, whatever that is, for the train buffs
Nagiso-end-of-Bruces-walk
Nagiso-end-of-Bruces-walk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have sorted out our transport across the Kurobe – Tateyama Alpine Route and will head off today for the start.

 

 

The rest of the ARDF chamnpionships

Hi,

¬† to all those still following ūüôā

Today’s blog comes from Bruce, and covers the last 2 days of competition here in Gumna.

However, before that, here’s some pictures from the awards ceremony covering the first 2 days.

The Aussie team
The Aussie team
GOLD for Australia. Kristian M21 champion
GOLD for Australia. Kristian M21 champion
Me ! Bronze for Day 1 ARDF on 2m
Me ! Bronze for Day 1 ARDF on 2m
Team Bronze for Jack Ewen Day 1
Team Bronze for Jack Ewen Day 1
Jenelle 3rd on Sprint Event
Jenelle 3rd on Sprint Event
Ewen the silver sprinter
Ewen the silver sprinter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yesterday was the 2nd classic ARDF event; 2m for Jenelle, Ewen & Jack, 80m for Kristian and myself.

Yep more wettish conditions, but far less rain, more just humidity and wet forest. After issues with water somehow making it into the 80m sniffers the day before, in the torrential rain on the Sprint day, we were all equipped with multiple layers of plastic bags today.

On the bus, Day 3 classic ARDF
On the bus, Day 3 classic ARDF
Flooded river
Flooded river
The start, Day 3 (same start on Day 1,3 & 4 !
The start, Day 3 (same start on Day 1,3 & 4 !

The Start location was the same, but we went the opposite direction.

For some reason they had North at an angle and downwards on the map; no orienteering conventions followed here !  At least there are blue North lines.

The terrain was hillier, with some pretty impressive cliffs.

Kristian wasn’t quite able to maintain his commanding form today, but still managed a commendable silver, as luckily others in Open found it tough too. We estimate the running ‘orienteering’ time would have been under 30mins, so the course length was short, but tricky dircetion finding.

Ooops. Typhoon damage.
Ooops. Typhoon damage.

Not the same story in my age group, with some times around 44 mins (well under the Open times, with the TX we didn’t have to find only a few mins extra.
I had an awful day making mistakes/confused on both my first and last TX, so with 2 major errors consigned down to 7th.

All Jenelle’s W60 girls DNF’d either with overtime or no TXs found, with Jenelle heartbreakingly the closest on only 2 mins overtime. The overtime rules in ARDF are sudden death ! Time limit was 2.5 hours. More some navigational confusion this time, apparently. No medals in W60 for this one.

Ewen and Jack have pulled off a team gold. Jack did a great course to get bronze, but Ewen had a pretty awful time on 2m at one of the TX’s, and made it back with only minutes to spare. Those who beat Jack, though, each only had 1 team-mate, and they both failled to find all TX’s, so that puts the team result up the top, despite the pretty average total time.

Greg, as a roving field referee, may have travelled more distance than any of us competitors, as he visited all controls, both 2m and 80m, and he had a fun time walking aroind with his Japanese counterpart. One 80m TX was misplaced, resulting in it being only about 350m from another 80m TX. Both Kristian and my GPS traces confirm this. The organisers are collecting all contributed competitors GPS tracks in order to do some sort of live replay.

So, another pretty good day for the Aussies.

In the FoxOr today, the courses were yet again from the same start area, this time with a map overlapping with the first classic a fair bit, but landscape rather than portrait.

Again Kristian beats all for gold on a physically tough M21 course (only drop 1 particular FoxOr). By a good 25min margin too.

Today he was joined by Jennelle who picked her way carefully through the W60 course to soundly beat the other 2 ladies. Another gold.

Ewen had nothing left in the tank afterwards but did a consistent course to get a well earned silver.  The
orienteering expertise showing through.

That’s it for the medals today.¬† Looked for a while like I might get one despite a poor order selection on my part (really I should know better!), but two Lee’s from Korea downloaded very late,¬† both with shorter times,¬† pushing me into the 4th place twilight zone, with Nikolai from USA in first.

Nikolai from USA (originally Moldova) who thrashed me in the M50 sprint.
Nikolai from USA (originally Moldova) who thrashed me in the M50 sprint.

Great event by Japan, in challenging conditions, especially the sprint day. This terrain was much more forest runnable than back in 2005.

The only comments I might make were:
– The training day transmitters were not properly representative of those used in the field.
– Downloading at the hotel afterwards is a bit frustrating, not knowing till much later in the day how you fared.
– Transmitter placement a bit off yesterday resulting in TXs too close (but it didn’t really impact on the competition).
РStart list generation needs lots of work.  Many in same category starting together.

Pictures from tonight’s awarding ceremony may appear in a later blog.

Cheers Bruce

Outdoor adventures Japan (or Part b of Blog 2)

Sunrise at Izukyu Shimoda DSC_0276 (Medium)
Sunrise at Izukyu Shimoda (an omen for the weather to come)

 

Sea kayaking.

Getting ready to kayak
Getting ready to kayak

Initial on land instructions, safety briefing, kitted out and out into the sea to practice paddling, and use of the rudder. Only one unscheduled swim from yours truly, unreal sensation. Paddled for about 2 hours to nearby cove (couldn’t call it a beach). Snorkelled, lucky enough to see some pretty little fish, a couple of larger ones that I tried to pursue but they could swim faster than me. Lunch on the rocks and headed back to starting point, Bruce, Kris and Ewen seemed to be quite proficient. As far as I was concerned steering the kayak was not second nature and invariably became unstuck at a critical moment. Arrived back at our starting point just as the afternoon storm broke. Almost didn’t need a shower to wash off the salt.

Transported back to Shimoda station, with just enough time to book tickets for the train to Tokyo. We journeyed together for part of the way. The last we saw of Bruce and Kris, was them scurrying along the platform to catch their connection in 4 minutes.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Prepared with our skirts
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Setting out
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Kayak1
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Kayak 2
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Kayak 3
IMG_1490 (Medium)
Preparing lunch
IMG_1485 (Medium)
Guide
IMG_1481 (Medium)
Beached!!
IMG_1484 (Medium)
Quick escape
IMG_1486 (Medium)
Prelunch swim !
IMG_1487 (Medium)
Prelunch swim 2
IMG_1488 (Medium)
Preparing lunch
IMG_1489 (Medium)
Preparing lunch 2
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Worth the wait
IMG_1491 (Medium)
After lunch stroll 1
IMG_1492 (Medium)
After lunch stroll 2
IMG_1494 (Medium)
Something in the rocks 1
IMG_1496 (Medium)
Something in the rocks 2
IMG_1497 (Medium)
Beach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Friday in Tokyo, Ewen and Jenelle took a bike tour. Very exhilarating riding on the streets of Tokyo, not for the faint hearted.

 

 

Island built on refuse
Island built on refuse.
Green building with Rice paddy inside DSC_0281 (Medium)
Green building with Rice paddy inside
Tokyo Railway Station DSC_0282 (Medium)
Tokyo Railway Station
Outside Imperial Palace DSC_0288 (Medium)
View of the entrance to the Imperial Palace
Oeno Park DSC_0294 (Medium)
Oeno Park
Water Lily at Oeno Park
Lotus flower at Oeno Park
I found a bear DSC_0301 (Medium)
I found a bear!!
Bear and riding companions DSC06679 (Medium)
Bear and riding companions
Our shelter from the afternoon storm DSC06690 (Medium) (2)
Our shelter from the afternoon storm
Good karma DSC_0312 (Medium)
Good karma
Shinto Shrine DSC_0331 (Medium)
Shinto Shrine
The safe way to cross the street DSC_0305 (Medium)
The safe way to cross the street
Riding through Akihabara DSC06669 (Medium)
Riding through Akihabara – not for the faint hearted
One beautiful temple along the way DSC_0309 (Medium)
One beautiful temple along the way

 

 

Tokyo tower DSC06695 (Medium) (2)
Tokyo tower – the communication engineers temple
Kiyosumi Gardens - this was the highlight for me
Kiyosumi Gardens – this was the highlight for me
Kiyosumi Gardens 2 DSC_0339 (Medium)
Kiyosumi Gardens 2
Kiyosumi Gardens 3DSC_0342 (Medium)
Kiyosumi Gardens 3

 

 

 

 

 

Kiyosumi Gardens 4 DSC_0345 (Medium)
Kiyosumi Gardens 4

 

Saturday trip to Mt Fuji

It took about 40 minutes longer than expected to get to Mt Fuji, bus travel is not the way to go in Japan. Passed an amazing fun park on the way.

Fun park Fuji QDSC_0352 (Medium)
Fun park Fuji Q

Ewen, Mark and Jenelle joined Jack for a tour. We eventually got to Fuji 5th station (where the climb starts) about midday. The traffic was very heavy and crowds of people. Fuji was being coy, and only managed a fleeting glimpse as the fog rolled in.

DSC_0361 (Medium)
First glimpse of Fuji
DSC_0355 (Medium)
Mark at entrance to the climb at 5th station
DSC_0364 (Medium)
Weekend crowds at 5th station
DSC_0378 (Medium)
Selfie

Visited the lava forest, Shiraito Falls and Lakes and garden.

DSC_0408 (Medium)
Lava forest
DSC_0387 (Medium)
Lava forest 2
DSC_0386 (Medium)
Enchanted forest from the Magic Faraway tree.
DSC_0411 (Medium)
Maybe some goblin is hiding underneath
DSC_0410 (Medium)
Some interesting vegetation
DSC06724 (Medium)
Down to the cave
DSC06725 (Medium)
Some of us were more cautious
DSC_0405 (Medium)
A really cool place in more ways than one.
DSC_0423 (Medium)
Shiraito no Taki Falls 1
DSC_0417 (Medium)
Shiraito no Taki Falls 2
DSC_0443 (Medium)
Final glimpses of Fuji 1
DSC_0435 (Medium)
Final glimpses of Fuji 2
DSC_0451 (Medium)
Manicured Gardens
DSC_0459 (Medium)
Walled Gardens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSC_0375 (Medium)
Look who was waiting for us a the railway station. It is a pity we had booked the bus. We could have done with a really useful engine.

PS

These activities seem quite tame after more recent events!!

Photos of Himeji castle  from previous blog

Himeji castle
Himeji castle